2020-07-18

The latest scientific research found that the moon we see every night is not the first moon on earth

By yqqlm yqqlm

getInterUrl?uicrIvZQ=bf32e99554fb44b7cc52ec72da33ebed - The latest scientific research found that the moon we see every night is not the first moon on earth

A new theory shows The moon we see every night is not the first moon of the earth, but the last of a series of satellites orbiting the earth. The moon formed through this process can travel through orbits, collide and merge, slowly building the larger moon we see today.

The moon, and how it was formed, has long been a source of charm and miracle. Now, an Israeli research team proposes that the moon we see every night is not the first moon of the earth, but the last of a series of satellites orbiting the earth in the past.

Professor Harge Peretz of the Institute of Technology and researchers at the Weizmann Institute recently proposed a theory that is contrary to the commonly held &34;Huge Impact&34; way, that is, the Moon is a planet on Mars A single object formed after a huge collision between an asteroid-like planet and ancient Earth.

&34; Our model shows that the ancient earth once had a series of satellites, each of which was formed by a different collision from the original earth&34;. &34; These small satellites are likely to be ejected later, or collide with the earth, or collide with each other to form a larger satellite. In order to examine the formation conditions of such small satellites or small satellites, the researchers conducted 800 simulations of the Earth’s impact.

The new model is consistent with the scientific community’s current understanding of the formation of the earth. In the final stage of growth, the Earth experienced many violent collisions with other celestial bodies. Each impact provides more material in place until it reaches its current size.

&34; We believe that there were many satellites before the earth&34;&34; Therefore, when a huge impact from another moon occurs, a previously formed moon may already exist.

Tidal forces from the earth may cause the satellite to migrate outward slowly (the current moon is moving slowly at a rate of about 1 cm per year). When another moon is formed, the pre-existing moon will slowly move out. However, their mutual gravity will eventually cause the satellites to influence each other and change their orbit.

&34; Small satellites formed through this process are likely to cross orbits, collide and merge &34; a series of such moon-to-moon collisions may gradually form a larger moon-that’s what we see today To the moon.