2021-03-31

Indonesian air crash cockpit voice recorder found it may take a week to read data

By yqqlm yqqlm

China News Service, March 31. According to Reuters, Indonesia’s Srivaki Air Flight SJ182 crashed into the sea in January, killing all 62 people on board. The latest news shows that divers have found the cockpit voice recorder of the crashed airliner. Indonesian aviation accident investigators said on March 31 that it may take about a week to hear the recording.

According to reports, the Minister of Transport of Indonesia stated that the cockpit voice recorder was found late on the 30th local time. A navy official said that it was found under a meter of sand. The cockpit voice recorder can help investigators understand the actions taken by the pilot of the crashed airliner at the time of the incident.

Indonesian air crash cockpit voice recorder found it may take a week to read data

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p >On March 31, local time, at Tanjung Prek Port, Jakarta, Indonesia, the Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee staff put the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) of SJ182 on the table.

The head of Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee, Jiayono, said: “We will take the cockpit voice recorder to the laboratory for reading. It will take about (it will take) three days to one week.” “Then, We will transcribe it and match it with the flight data recorder (FDR). Without the cockpit voice recorder, it would be difficult to determine the cause of the (accident) in the crash of flight SJ182.”

The report pointed out that safety experts said that most aviation accidents are caused by a combination of multiple factors, and it may take several months to determine the cause.

On January 9, 2021, a Boeing 737-500 passenger plane of SJ182 from Jakarta to Pontianak, the capital of West Kalimantan of Indonesia, crashed in the Kuril Islands of Jakarta. A crash in the regional waters killed all 62 people on board.

On February 10, the Indonesian National Transportation Safety Board issued a preliminary investigation report on the passenger plane crash, stating that the failure of the automatic throttle may be the cause of the plane’s loss of control and crashing into the sea. The report said that the above conclusions are based on data read from the flight data recorder of the crashed passenger plane salvaged from the bottom of the sea, as well as data from airport air traffic control.