2021-03-05

Shandong University’s research team found space hurricanes in observation data in 2014

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Shandong University’s research team found space hurricanes in observation data in 2014

The space hurricane is “atomic rain” instead of water. Researchers say it is very similar to the hurricane that occurs in the lower atmosphere of the earth in many respects. Researchers believe that space hurricanes are caused by the extremely large and rapid transfer of solar wind energy and charged particles to the upper atmosphere of the Earth.

Shandong University’s research team found space hurricanes in observation data in 2014(1)

Shandong University’s research team found space hurricanes in observation data in 2014(2)

Shandong University’s research team found space hurricanes in observation data in 2014(3)

Although this is the first time a space hurricane has been observed, because of the presence of plasma and magnetic fields in planetary atmospheres everywhere in the universe, space hurricanes are likely to be a common phenomenon. Interestingly, hurricanes have also been observed in the lower atmospheres of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. Space hurricanes in the upper atmospheres of other planets have not been detected before.

Shandong University’s research team found space hurricanes in observation data in 2014(4)

Observed in the Earth’s atmosphere The space hurricane rotates counterclockwise and has spiral arms. It lasted almost 8 hours before it broke. Scientific analysis uses data from satellites, radars, and other sources to maintain consistency and establish a picture of what is happening in order to better understand the mechanism of its development.

Space hurricanes occur during periods of low geomagnetic activity, which suggests that they may be more common in the solar system and throughout the universe. This discovery highlights the importance of learning and monitoring space weather, because storms may disrupt GPS satellites in orbit.