2021-04-20

Super Typhoon Shuriji “crashes” the Pacific Ocean, peripheral circulation affects the Philippines and tens of thousands of people evacuate

By yqqlm yqqlm

“Suleki” (called Bising in the Philippines) was the first typhoon and the second named storm in the Pacific Northwest in 2021. According to data from the United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), the super typhoon had sustained wind speeds of 165 knots (190 miles/305 km/h) in the afternoon of April 17. According to data from the Japan Meteorological Agency, the central pressure inside the storm dropped to 895 mbar, one of the lowest readings on record.

Super Typhoon Shuriji “crashes” the Pacific Ocean, peripheral circulation affects the Philippines and tens of thousands of people evacuate

The infrared satellite image above is 4 It was taken around noon on the 19th with the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on NOAA-20. The cloud cover of “Shuliky” is displayed using brightness temperature data, which is useful for distinguishing between the colder cloud structure and the warmer ground surface below. Around that time, JTWC reported that the typhoon had a sustained wind speed of 120 knots (140 miles/220 km/h).

The path of the typhoon is expected to change and stay offshore, but its outer circulation has been affecting the central and northern islands of the Philippines, causing these areas to be hit by heavy rains, strong winds and coastal flooding. At least one person has been killed and nearly 100,000 people have been evacuated from coastal areas.

Super Typhoon Shuriji “crashes” the Pacific Ocean, peripheral circulation affects the Philippines and tens of thousands of people evacuate(1)

This picture is April 18 It was taken early in the morning using the VIIRS night band (DNB) on the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP satellite. DNB can detect a series of wavelengths of light from green to near-infrared, and use filtering technology to observe light signals such as city lights, firelight, and reflected moonlight. The picture shows atmospheric gravity waves propagating from the eye of the storm.

“Strong convection associated with strong tropical cyclones can produce gravity waves that travel up to 30 kilometers or more in the atmosphere,” wrote Matthew Barlow, a climate scientist at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. “These waves may look similar to ripples in a pond because they have similar physical mechanisms, albeit at very different scales.”

According to data from the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration, West The typhoon season in the Pacific generally peaks from July to October. An average of 20 tropical cyclones form in the area each year, and eight or nine pass through the Philippines.

“The large-scale environment created by typhoons in the Pacific Northwest is more favorable than last year,” said meteorologist Jeff Masters. “More warm water exists, and La Niña is now fading towards neutral conditions.”

The NASA Earth Observatory image was taken by Joshua Stevens, using NASA EOSDIS LANCE, GIBS/Worldview, VIIRS data from the Somi National Polar Orbiting Partner Satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS).