2021-05-20

Scientists speed up or slow down the ripening process of tomatoes through the CHLORAD regulatory pathway

By yqqlm yqqlm

Scientists speed up or slow down the ripening process of tomatoes through the CHLORAD regulatory pathway

This work is in the plant science department of the university In the process, the researchers investigated the underlying mechanism behind the tomato ripening process. As we all know, tiny units called plastids are full of proteins, which play a central role in them and make tomatoes and other bright colors, but how they do this is not well understood.

Therefore, the scientists further investigated and turned their attention to a previously discovered regulatory pathway called CHLORAD (short for chloroplast-associated protein degradation), which allows plastids to move from other parts of the plant Enter the protein they need and remove the protein they don’t need. This allows the plastids not only to ripen the fruit, but also to perform various functions essential to the success of the plant, from seed germination to fruit production.

Scientists speed up or slow down the ripening process of tomatoes through the CHLORAD regulatory pathway(1)

Through more detailed research, scientists can It is determined that a single protein in the plastid plays a regulatory role in the CHLORAD system. Scientists were able to show that knocking out the gene responsible for this SP1 protein would delay the ripening of tomatoes, while increasing its expression would accelerate ripening.

Scientists speed up or slow down the ripening process of tomatoes through the CHLORAD regulatory pathway(2)

Scientists believe that this discovery is a manipulation of CHLORAD Systematic technology has laid the foundation to improve the efficiency of crop production. For example, it may be used to increase the yield of potato plants, to create wheat that stays green for longer to produce more grains, or to make tomatoes mature quickly or stay fresh for longer.

Professor Paul Jarvis, the author of the research report, said: “The regulatory properties of SP1 revealed in our research show that it has real potential as a crop improvement technology. For example, it can be used To develop early or late ripening fleshy fruit varieties, or to improve the transportability or shelf life of the fruit by delaying the ripening without affecting the quality of the ripe fruit. What is fascinating is that in these tiny subcellular structures called plastids The amount of a single protein can have such a profound effect on the ripening of tomatoes.”

Scientists speed up or slow down the ripening process of tomatoes through the CHLORAD regulatory pathway(3)

This research was published in the journal Nature-Plants.