2021-05-04

Studies have shown that human inbreeding avoidance strategies are not common in nature

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” said Raïssa de Boer, a zoology researcher at Stockholm University: “It is assumed that if possible, animals should avoid mating with relatives. But evolutionary theory has told us that for more than 40 years, under a wide range of conditions, animals will tolerate and even like to mate with relatives. ”

Studies have shown that human inbreeding avoidance strategies are not common in nature

The study involved 88 species A synthesis of 139 experimental studies was carried out, and the research spanning 40 years has resolved the long-standing debate between theory and empirical expectations about whether and when animals should avoid inbreeding.

Raïssa de Boer said:” We solved the’elephant’ problem in inbreeding avoidance research, and overturned the general assumption that animals would avoid inbreeding as much as possible. ”

This study shows that animals rarely try to avoid mating with relatives. This finding is consistent across a wide range of conditions and experimental methods.” Regina, a researcher at Stockholm University and author of the paper- Vega-Trejo said: “When animals choose whom to mate with, they don’t seem to care whether their potential partners are brothers, sisters, cousins, or unrelated individuals.” The study also looked at human inbreeding avoidance. The results were compared with similar experiments on animals.

Studies have shown that human inbreeding avoidance strategies are not common in nature(1)

Dr. John Fitzpatrick, Researcher at Wallenberg College, Department of Zoology, Stockholm University

This finding helps explain why many studies have failed to find clear support for the inbreeding avoidance theory, and for a better understanding of cognitive and ecological related How factors shape an animal’s inbreeding avoidance strategy provides a useful roadmap. The results of the research will also have a wide-ranging impact on the discipline of how to protect living things. Mating selection is increasingly being used in protective breeding programs in an attempt to make the protection of endangered species successful.

One of the main goals of conservation work is to maintain genetic diversity, and mating selection is usually expected to achieve this goal. Of course, when conducting protective reproduction, you must still be cautious when applying mate selection.