2021-06-30

“Flashing starburst” stimulation: a new optical illusion reveals how the brain connects these dots

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“Flashing starburst” stimulation: a new optical illusion reveals how the brain connects these dots

“This research illustrates how the brain’connects dots’, creating a subjective reality in what we see, highlighting the constructive nature of perception,” New York University Psychology Pascal Wallisch, associate clinical professor of the Department and Data Science Center and senior author of the paper, explained that the paper was published in the journal i-Perception.

The first author of the study, Michael Karlovich, added: “The study of optical illusions helps to understand visual processing because they allow us to distinguish the pure perception of physical object attributes from the perceptual experience.” He is a job at Recursia Founder and CEO of Shishi (a multidisciplinary art and fashion production company).

The study author admits that the visual effects of this illusion are superficially similar to some of the effects of other grid-based illusions previously described. However, their Scintillating Starburst is different from known optical illusions. It evokes some newly discovered effects, including fleeting illusion lines diagonally connecting the intersections of star polygons.

“Flashing starburst” stimulation: a new optical illusion reveals how the brain connects these dots(1)

To better understand how we deal with For this kind of illusion, the researchers conducted a series of experiments with more than 100 participants. They watched 162 different versions of “flickering starbursts” with different shapes, complexity, and brightness.

The researchers were then asked a series of questions about what they saw–for example, “I didn’t see any bright lines, rays, or beams”, “I might see bright lines, Rays or beams, but they are almost indistinct” and “I see bright lines, rays or beams, but they are very faint.”

The author found that the convergence of several factors is important, including contrast, line width and the number of vertices. “In particular, a large number of prominent intersections will result in stronger and more vivid rays, because there are more clues to indicate implied lines,” Wallisch observed.

Therefore, this research illustrates how the brain “connects these points” to create a person’s subjective reality, even at the perceptual level, highlighting the constructive nature of perception.