2021-07-16

The European Southern Observatory releases an amazing series of “cosmic fireworks” images of nearby galaxies

By yqqlm yqqlm

The European Southern Observatory releases an amazing series of “cosmic fireworks” images of nearby galaxies

Every tiny spot is a young star. There are thousands of them in each picture, as well as ethereal areas of gas-these gases have created more nascent furnaces, ready to burn for billions of years.

What we see is far from just beautiful pictures, but to help astronomers better understand how stars form and evolve. Normally, gas and dust will accumulate and gather together because of gravity. This cosmic cloud saw the atoms smashed together and collided violently until the nuclear fusion reaction started the engine of the star, and it began to burn for many centuries. ESA images provide observations of these different stages of star life.

Astronomer Eric Emsellem of ESO, Germany, said in a press release: “We can directly observe the gas that gives birth to stars here. We see the young stars themselves, and we have witnessed them in various stages. The evolution of.”

Astronomers focused their attention on nearby galaxies and used Very Large Telescopes to image gas and young stars. Then, they superimposed ALMA images (suitable for capturing gas clouds) together to create an amazing “firework” show. This can also help researchers uncover some more mysteries of star birth.

The European Southern Observatory releases an amazing series of “cosmic fireworks” images of nearby galaxies(1)

Although they have a good grasp of pregnancy Process, but obtaining various images of these nearby galaxies can raise more specific questions. For example, in a galaxy, in what type of place we might expect stars to form… and why?

The catalog of imaged galaxies is getting bigger and bigger, and we are just beginning to understand the diversity of the birthplaces of these stars. This will be enhanced by new instruments, including NASA’s long-delayed James Webb Space Telescope, which will be able to image the universe in unprecedented detail. On the ground, ESA is planning to put extremely large telescopes into use in ten years.

So when astronomers are busy making images, we just have to stare at the fruits of their labor. The most difficult part is just picking your favorite galaxy.