2021-09-30

British study: people with previous depression or anxiety disorders are more affected by the covid-19 pandemic

By yqqlm yqqlm

British study: people with previous depression or anxiety disorders are more affected by the covid-19 pandemic </ P >

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p > this study, published in the British Journal of psychiatry and funded by ukri, studied the data of 59482 people who were regularly surveyed as part of 12 ongoing longitudinal studies in the UK. The study found that, compared with those with average levels of anxiety and depression symptoms, in the first 8 to 10 months of the pandemic, those who responded to the survey before the pandemic showed higher levels of anxiety and depression symptoms were 24% more likely to delay medical procedures, 12% more likely to lose their jobs, and 33% more likely to interrupt prescription or drug treatment</ p>

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p > the study found that those with more severe symptoms of depression or anxiety were more likely to be disturbed in work, income and health care</ p>

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p > Dr. raveetha patalay (UCL), senior author of the paper, said: “our results emphasize that those with mental health problems disproportionately experience the broader health and economic impact of the epidemic, which may lead to the deterioration of long-term outcomes for those who have experienced unconscionable health, even after the pandemic.” </ P >

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p > Professor Nishi Chaturvedi (MRC lifelong health and aging Department of UCL), who co led the covid-19 national core study on longitudinal health and well-being, said: “The anxiety and depression experienced by the study participants exceeded the mental diseases reported to general practitioners and medical services. This is a largely neglected group and is vulnerable to the potential long-term health and socio-economic consequences of the pandemic.” </ P >

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p > lead author Dr. Giorgio di Gessa (UCL Institute of epidemiology and health care) said: “Policymakers should take these findings into account when providing future health care and financial support, because if these disturbances are not addressed, it is possible to further expand health inequality. Pharmacists and primary health care workers should pay special attention to ensure that people with mental health problems do not miss appointments, visits and prescriptions.” </ P >

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p > “It is also important to note that psychological distress before the pandemic is generally more common among women, the younger generation, ethnic minorities and people with lower education, which means that interference has a greater overall impact on these groups.” </ P >

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p > Dr. Michael Green (University of Glasgow), lead author of the study, said: “During the pandemic, many people lost their jobs or lost their income and faced interruptions in health care. Our research shows that such interruptions are particularly likely to affect people with previous mental illness.” </ P >

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p > “We need to ensure that these vulnerable groups do not have too difficult access to health care and financial support, especially when existing epidemiological financial support such as vacation is eliminated.” </ P >

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p > this work was carried out as part of the covid-19 longitudinal national core study on health and well-being, led by UCL researchers and funded by ukri. The study involved researchers from UCL, King’s College London, the University of Glasgow, the University of Leicester, the University of Edinburgh and the University of Bristol. </ P >

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p > in each longitudinal study, respondents were on average in a pandemic In the first three years, they answered questionnaires designed to assess mental health. They later reported the interference they experienced between March and December last year. </ P >

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p > the researchers compared the “average” of those responses that showed anxiety and depression The interference faced by people with higher than average levels of anxiety and depression, regardless of whether they have a clinical diagnosis or are seeking treatment for mental illness. </ P >

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p > the research team studied the interference of the pandemic in three aspects: health care (medication, treatment or surgery and appointment); economic activity (employment, income or working hours) ; and housing (changes in address or family composition). They found that people with previous mental illness were more likely to face economic and health care interference, but housing interference was unlikely. </ P >

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p > Professor Chaturvedi added: “Ukri’s support has led to the collaboration of 12 longitudinal cohort studies, enabling us to address key pandemic related questions that cannot be answered in other ways.”