2021-09-29

Injecting dead bacteria into tumors brings hope for cancer treatment

By yqqlm yqqlm

At the end of the 19th century, a scientist named William Coley suspected an unusual relationship between bacterial infection and cancer remission. So he began to try different bacterial formulas to treat cancer</ p>

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p > these formulas are called Coley’s toxins. Coley inadvertently and unconsciously became a pioneer in cancer immunotherapy. For most of the 20th century, his research was classified as a footnote in the history of science. His experiments are somewhat unstable and lack any standardization, so few researchers can replicate his results</ p>

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p > recently, however, renewed attention to the complex interactions between our health and the bacteria living in our bodies has prompted an Australian research team to re-examine Coley’s ideas for the 21st century. Aude Fahrer, the project’s lead researcher, described this experimental treatment as simple and cheap</ p>

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p > Fahrer indicates: “It involves injecting a slowly released solution of dead mold directly into the cancer. Our idea is that this will allow immune cells to enter the cancer to attack these bacteria, even if they have died, and as a side effect, make immune cells attack the cancer. Once immune cells reproduce, they can swim around the body, so it will not only attack the cancer at the injection site It will also attack any metastatic site – that is, the cancer has spread to another part of the body. ” </ P >

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p > the therapy consists of three components. Mineral oil and a surfactant form an adjuvant called Montanide isa-51. This adjuvant has been licensed for use in humans and has been used in several vaccines to improve immune response. The third component is simple heat killed mycobacteria. </ P >

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p > this is called complete Froude adjuvant (CFA) Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) , not new. In fact, it was originally developed by a researcher named Jules t Freund in the 1950s. Although its individual components have been licensed for human use, CFA has not been safely approved for any clinical treatment. </ P >

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p > 5b868c57763aeaf - Injecting dead bacteria into tumors brings hope for cancer treatment </ P >

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p > published on 《Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer》 This new study on reports the effects of CFA on several preclinical models and a small number of human patients. The treatment methods tested include direct injection of CFA’s new sustained-release emulsion into tumors. </ P >

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p > preclinical experiments show that CFA is safe in several animal models, including mice, dogs and horses. Systemic targeting tumor cells has been detected in all preclinical trials Immune response. </ P >

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p > the study also reports early data from an ongoing phase I human trial testing the CFA formula. Preliminary results show that the therapy is safe in humans, but the current efficacy data are unclear. This is mainly because these phase 1 trials are conducted in patients with unusually advanced cancer. </ P >

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p > “As part of this trial, we have treated eight patients,” Fahrer said. “They are all advanced patients, but especially in one case, we can significantly improve the quality of life of patients. The treatment reduces the amount of fluid around their lungs and reduces one of their cancers.” </ P >

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p > obviously, a lot of work needs to be done before this treatment can enter the clinic. But the researchers say these early signs are promising, and this treatment is cheaper and easier to manage than the recent innovation of immunotherapy. </ P >

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p > Fahrer added: “the best thing about this new treatment is that it requires less dose, simple management and less side effects. (in addition) Its cost is also very low. We are looking for a dose of about $20, while the cost of other immunotherapies may be as high as $40000. This makes this treatment available to patients in developing countries. “