2021-09-28

New research questions the earth’s plate tectonic model and believes that continent growth is not a continuous process

By yqqlm yqqlm

New research questions the earth’s plate tectonic model and believes that continent growth is not a continuous process < / P > < p > according to the model used, five, six, seven or even more continents constitute emerging parts of the earth’s continental crust. They have different topography and rock composition of different composition and age. This diversity makes them difficult to study</ p> < p > Marion Gar ç on, a researcher at the magmatic and volcanic Laboratory of the National Centre for scientific research of France (CNRS / IRD / Clermont Auvergne University), studied a data compilation that gathered information on sedimentary rocks from 3.7 billion years ago to today. Using chemical data obtained since the 1980s, the researcher revisited the records of sedimentary rocks. In this new study, she can draw two conclusions and question some models and theories about continental growth</ p>

New research questions the earth’s plate tectonic model and believes that continent growth is not a continuous process(1) < / P > < p > at the top of the land, the average silica (SiO2) content changes with time. Orange in the figure represents the current value of continental crust, that is, 67% of its mass, while green stars represent the current value of marine crust, that is, 50% of its mass. Compared with the oceanic crust with low silicon content, the continental crust has always been rich in silicon. At the bottom. Major crustal growth periods (gray vertical bars) have been recorded in sedimentary rocks over the past 3.7 billion years</ p> < p > the first conclusion is that the continent has always been rich in silica. On average, silica accounts for 67% of the mass of the continent, and the content of silica has never been less than 60% throughout the history of the earth. This first finding contradicts some models that believe that at the beginning of earth’s history, the continent was relatively deficient in silica, but rich in iron and magnesium</ p> < p > her second conclusion is that mainland growth is not a continuous process. In the past 3.7 billion years, there have been six major continental growth periods, which occur every 500-700 million years. These events enabled the continent to grow to its present size. They may be related to the assembly and fracture cycle of supercontinents, such as the most famous Pangea</ p> < p > in the history of our planet, the supercontinent has experienced a period of division and assembly, and its frequency is similar to that of the six continental growth events found in this study. Although it is not possible to establish a correlation between these events, it may help to guide future research. Gar ç on’s work provides new enlightenment for the composition of the continent and its growth over time, making it possible to improve the geological model, thus paving the way for new research</ p>