2021-09-30

Research: crops grow better by injecting beneficial bacteria into Martian soil

By yqqlm yqqlm

Research: crops grow better by injecting beneficial bacteria into Martian soil </ P >

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p > extremely dry and dusty give the red planet its unique color of rocky land, which is very bad for farming. It is well known that Martian rocks lack the usual organic matter from plants and animals, which provides nutrition for crops, which means that attempts to grow things only in this soil will make scientists hungry</ p>

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p > but with a little help, it can become feasible. Previous studies have shown that adding grass debris, feces and worms can greatly improve Martian soil and help plants grow. Now, another missing part of the puzzle has been added and encouraging results have been achieved</ p>

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p > nitrogen is more or less the most important nutrient for plants, and the lack of nitrogen-containing molecules in Martian rocks has become a major blow. In the new study, researchers at Colorado State University set out to rejoin soil bacteria by fixing nitrogen from the air</ p>

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p > the team planted clover in simulated Martian soil samples, some of which were paired with nitrogen fixing bacteria called Sinorhizobium meliloti. Sure enough, plants with symbiotic microorganisms grew better, and their roots and buds grew 75% more than clover alone in leigongyan</ p>

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p > but interestingly, the level of nitrogen molecules in the soil around the treated plants did not increase. If it increases, this may be a useful way to improve recycled stone over time, making it more and more suitable for growing crops. Nevertheless, these results do suggest that these key microorganisms may be an important component of future Martian farmers</ p>

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p > the author of this study pointed out: “this study shows that the nodes forming bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti have been proved to be able to knot in Martian Leigong rock and make clover (sweet clover) in greenhouse experiment This work has increased our understanding of the interaction between plants and microorganisms, which will help in geotechnical transformation efforts on Mars. “