2021-09-29

Research has found that the new drug adavosertib can bring hope to slow down the growth rate of colorectal cancer

By yqqlm yqqlm

Research has found that the new drug adavosertib can bring hope to slow down the growth rate of colorectal cancer </ P >

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p > the trial studied a drug called adavosertib to see if it could delay tumor regeneration in patients with inoperable aggressive subtypes of colorectal cancer. In the study, patients took daily tablets. It is reported that these patients have limited treatment options</ p>

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p > the researchers compared 44 patients taking adavosertib with 25 patients not taking adavosertib. The results showed that the drug could delay tumor growth by about two months on average, and there were relatively few side effects. The drug had a greater impact on 31 patients with left / rectal tumors and also increased overall survival – that is, patients lived longer</ p>

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p > however, the researchers cautioned that these are early results and that larger trials are needed to determine whether the drug can improve survival compared with standard treatment. Although the trial tested adavosertib in patients resting after chemotherapy, the drug may also benefit patients with other types of colorectal cancer or can be carried out simultaneously with standard treatment in other treatment lines</ p>

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p > among the patients participating in the trial, some tumors have two common mutations – RAS and TP53. The researchers hypothesized that these two mutations will make the tumor more sensitive to the effects of drugs. About 1 / 3 of all colorectal cancer patients have these two mutations</ p>

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p > colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in Britain and the second largest cancer killer. In the UK, more than 42000 people are diagnosed with colorectal cancer every year</ p>

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p > Dr. Jenny Seligmann of the University of Leeds, the lead author of the study, said: “These results show promising signs that adavosertib may effectively delay the regrowth of colorectal cancer in some patients and be well tolerated. These findings are particularly encouraging because the patient subgroup involved accounts for 1 / 3 of all patients with colorectal cancer. Although other patients have specially developed treatment methods for their tumor types, the current treatment options of this group are very limited.” </ P >

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p > these findings come as part of a large collaborative trial called focus4 in the UK, which aims to study the best way to help inoperable colorectal cancer patients who have received some chemotherapy. </ P >

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p > it is reported that more than 1400 colorectal cancer patients have participated in the focus4 trial. Some of them have also participated in additional randomized controlled trials, which have special significance in cancer New drugs are tested on people with special chemical changes, which can indicate that these drugs may be effective. </ P >

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p > Professor Louise Brown, statistical director of focus4 trial and co-author of the paper (MRC clinical trial group of UCL), said: “Our UK wide trial is the first in the world to study the potential treatment of colorectal cancer by stratification according to the tumor chemical composition of patients. This enables us to test some new methods at the same time, which is a more effective test treatment. The results of the adavosertib group in the trial are of potential importance, which represents a glimmer of hope for this group of patients.” </ P >

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p > it is understood that adavosertib kills cancer cells by inhibiting Wee1, a protein that helps regulate the process of cell division in tumors, and it ensures that any DNA damage is repaired before cell division. </ P >

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p > researchers believe that tumors with Ras and TP53 mutations will be particularly sensitive to this form of attack, because these mutations have made the cell replication process Under pressure,

FOCUS4’s chief investigator, Tim Maughan of University of Oxford, said: “WEE1 inhibitors are targeted at the DNA repair process of tumor cells. A similar strategy is used to treat ovarian cancer and breast cancer with drugs called PARP inhibitors. However, this is the first time this strategy has been successfully applied in the treatment of colorectal cancer.” </ P >

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p > the side effects of this drug include fatigue, diarrhea, neutropenia and nausea, but the proportion is not high, accounting for less than 11% of patients. </ P >

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p > also published in the Journal of clinical oncology The second new study on the came from a separate part of the focus4 trial, focus4-n. the study examined the results of patients who completely interrupted treatment after chemotherapy and compared them with those who continued chemotherapy with a simple tablet called capecitabine. </ P >

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p > the researchers found that in those patients who completely interrupted treatment, the cancer began to grow longer than before Those patients who continued maintenance treatment earlier, but maintenance treatment did not lead to an increase in patients’ life span. </ P >

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p > Professor Richard Adams of Cardiff University, the lead author of the research paper, said: “These findings will help inform the discussion between patients and clinicians about treatment options after four months of treatment – that is, long-term adherence to oral chemotherapy or complete interruption of treatment – so that patients can better control their cancer management.” </ P >

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p > CEO of Cancer Research UK   Mitchell said: “Although this trial is to explore a new drug that can help delay the recurrence of colorectal cancer in patients undergoing chemotherapy, it opens the possibility that adavosertib can also be used to treat patients with limited options. New treatments for this group may change their lives, and we look forward to seeing the next stage of this study.” </ P >

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p > Professor Nick Lemoine, medical director of NIHR clinical research network, said: “Identifying the key molecular changes driving specific individual cancers will enable the right patients to receive the right drugs at the right time. The early results of this trial for patients with colorectal cancer show that detecting changes in two genes can choose to be actively treated with a well tolerated oral drug. Clinical trials such as focus4 allow multiple drugs to be tested in parallel parts of the study This has accelerated the time to establish convincing evidence for the future use of these drugs in the routine practice of the national medical service system. “