2021-09-29

The experiment found that electric sparks may appear on Mars, but they have little impact on human exploration activities

By yqqlm yqqlm

The experiment found that electric sparks may appear on Mars, but they have little impact on human exploration activities </ P >

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p > the Viking lander and subsequent orbiters in the 1970s detected mud, clay and wind-driven dust on Mars, raising questions about potential electrical activities</ p>

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p > scientists try to determine through experiments whether large-scale electric storms and lightning may occur, and whether the static electricity generated by particles mainly basalt on the planet will harm vehicles or ultimately humans wearing protective equipment</ p>

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p > using volcanic ash as a substitute for Martian dust, researchers at Josef dufek laboratory, a volcanologist at Ohio University, found that it is indeed possible to discharge in Martian dust demons and storms. However, given the weak electric field supported by the Martian atmosphere (close to 20000 volts per meter), the scale of the discharge may be small</ p>

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p > Joshua Mendes Harper, a research engineer at the Oregon volcanology center of the Department of Geosciences, said that in contrast, the earth’s atmosphere can withstand an electric field of 3 megavolts per meter and produce spectacular lightning storms, which are common and sometimes fatal in the southeastern United States. On Mars, it is also easy to produce sparks when stirring sand or dust. However, even in large dust storms or in dust storms, it may be difficult to obtain very large discharges or traditional lightning because the Martian atmosphere is poor in storing charges. Martian dust may flash, crackle or faint light when rolling through the dry landform of Mars, but its discharge may be very small, and they may not be seen except by detecting its radio waves</ p>

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p > in uo, m é ndez Harper, dufek and George McDonald (a postdoctoral researcher at Rutgers University) used a vertical glass tube with a diameter of about 4 inches and a length of 8 inches to create three electric charging by colliding basalt ash particles from the eruption of xitle volcano in Mexico about 2000 years ago</ p>

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p > the collision in the sealed tube occurred at the friction velocity expected to occur in the mild Martian wind, the particles did not contact the outer wall, and was carried out at the atmospheric pressure of 8 mbar carbon dioxide, which is similar to that on the Martian surface. Mexican basalts used in the project are similar to Martian basalts and are detected by Rovers in Pathfinder and Mars rover missions and dust analogues developed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory</ p>

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p > for comparison, the research team conducted experiments to bring particles into contact with unfamiliar surfaces under expected conditions on Mars. Sparks appeared in both groups of experiments, but an artificial wall was added to change the polarity of the discharge. The new experiment shows that the low-energy discharge on Mars means that these effects are unlikely to affect mechanical operation</ p>

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p > it seems that the Jezero crater, the landing site of perseverance, often experiences dust storms in autumn and winter. McDonald said this may provide an opportunity for preliminary observation of electrostatic phenomena. One of the objectives of the perseverance mission is to assess past environmental conditions. In the past, more evidence of the atmosphere will have an impact on the earth’s electrical environment and how it changes over time</ p>

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p > the biggest benefit of this study is that Mars may be an electrically active place, although in a completely different way from earth. The fact that simulated Martian dust can easily be charged to the discharge point suggests that future colonists may find a world that is subtly changed by static electricity</ p>