2021-10-03

Counterintuitive fact: dissolved salts can be recombined on a nanoscale

By yqqlm yqqlm

Counterintuitive fact: dissolved salts can be recombined on a nanoscale </ P >

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p > Zeng and his colleagues recently conducted computer simulations to determine how sodium chloride and its salty cousin lithium chloride react when they are submerged in nanoscale water flow bordered by two smooth water repellent walls</ p>

Counterintuitive fact: dissolved salts can be recombined on a nanoscale(1) </ P >

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p > atomic level rendering of sodium chloride (left) and lithium chloride (right), the main components of table salt. The new research of Zeng Xiaocheng et al. Shows that when confined to one nano space, sodium (dark blue) and chlorine (light blue) atoms can be recombined after being dissolved. According to the team’s simulation, lithium (pink) and chlorine atoms can do the same</ p>

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p > these simulations predict some very unusual things. According to the simulation results, after initially dissolved in water, the charged and randomly dispersed atoms of sodium chloride and lithium chloride will spontaneously recombine into a two-dimensional layer. In the case of sodium chloride, the layer will be the same as its solid and pre dissolved state: a square crystal pattern, each sodium atom is surrounded by four chlorine atoms, or vice versa. For lithium chloride, the layer will consist of a hexagonal ring – three lithium atoms, three chlorine atoms – or a herringbone chain of atoms, or both</ p>

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p > according to the calculation of the research team, this unexpected behavior is partly due to the reduction of the interaction strength between charged atoms – sodium, lithium or chlorine – and water molecules that usually form shells around them. The researchers found that this hydrated shell usually prevents oppositely charged particles such as sodium and chlorine from recombining after dissolution – but not when confined to a nanoscale space</ p>

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p > Zeng and his colleagues in computational chemists hope that their predictions will encourage other researchers to conduct experiments to verify or challenge their simulation results. These predictions may eventually provide useful information for the design of nanofluid devices that transport charged atoms to reproduce neuronal activity</ p>