2021-10-04

Genes for sex hormone synthesis may play a key role in the treatment of eczema

By yqqlm yqqlm

Genes for sex hormone synthesis may play a key role in the treatment of eczema </ P >

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p > atopic dermatitis (AD) is a form of eczema. Ad affects as many as 13% of children and 10% of adults, and the annual treatment cost in the United States alone is $5.3 billion</ p>

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p > “we usually think that eczema is a dry skin disease and use moisturizers to treat mild eczema,” said Tamia Harris Tryon, MD, corresponding author and assistant professor of Dermatology and immunology at utsw. “Research shows that a gene important for the production of sex hormones seems to play a role in the skin making its own moisturizer. If we can change the activity of this gene, we may moisturize ourselves by helping the skin make more oil and lipids, so as to provide mitigation measures for patients with eczema.”

Genes for sex hormone synthesis may play a key role in the treatment of eczema(1) </ P >

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p > Dr. Harris Tryon explained that previous studies have linked ad to excessive activity of genes responsible for the production of two inflammatory immune molecules, interleukin 4 and 13 (IL-4 and IL-13). A relatively new drug called dupilumab – a monoclonal antibody that reduces the number of inflammatory molecules – is very effective in many patients with moderate to severe AD. However, the molecular mechanism behind how IL-4 and IL-13 contribute to this form of eczema is unclear</ p>

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p > to study this problem, Dr. Harris Tryon and her colleagues focused on sebaceous cells, the cells that make up sebaceous glands. These glands produce an oily, waxy barrier that covers the skin and helps it retain moisture</ p>

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p > the researchers injected IL-4 and IL-13 into human sebaceous cells grown in Petri dishes, then used a technology called RNA sequencing to obtain the gene activity of the whole genome, and compared the gene activity with that of sebaceous cells not treated with these immune molecules. They found a gene called HSD3B1, which makes an enzyme called 3B hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1. When exposed to these two interleukin, its activity increased 60 times</ p>

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p > Dr. Harris Tryon said that this finding is surprising because this enzyme plays a well-known key role in the production of sex hormones such as testosterone and progesterone, but it has never been related to atopic dermatitis and skin lipid production. The database of human gene activity shows that HSD3B1 is often hyperactive in patients with eczema; A study of patients taking dupirumab showed that the drug appeared to reduce the activity of HSD3B1. Both evidences suggest that IL-4 and IL-13 promote the activity of this gene</ p>

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p > to determine how this gene affects sebum output, the researchers manipulated the activity of HSD3B1 in sebum cells grown in Petri dishes. They found that when they reduced the activity of this gene, sex hormone levels decreased and skin sebum secretion increased. Conversely, more genetic activity leads to more sex hormones and less sebum. The researchers also found similar findings in the ad model of mice. The production of sex hormones reduced the production of skin lipids</ p>

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p > Dr. Harris Tryon said that these findings together suggest that HSD3B1 may be a new target against AD and potentially other forms of eczema. Changing the output of this gene may eventually provide a treatment for AD, which is completely different from any existing treatment</ p>