2021-11-26

Autopsy of the lungs of covid-19 dead cases reveals how the virus spreads and destroys tissues

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728541fee08e8da - Autopsy of the lungs of covid-19 dead cases reveals how the virus spreads and destroys tissues

although the study is small (only lung samples from 18 cases and plasma samples from 6 cases), the scientists say their data reveal some trends, It can help develop new covid-19 treatments and fine tune when to use existing treatments at different stages of disease progression. These findings include details on how sars-cov-2 (the virus that causes covid-19) spreads in the lungs, manipulates the immune system, causes extensive thrombosis, and targets signaling pathways that promote lung failure, fibrosis, and damaged tissue repair. The researchers say these data are particularly relevant to COVID-19 patients who care for the elderly, obesity or diabetes, who are considered to be high-risk groups in serious cases. The study sample was from patients with at least one high-risk symptom

Autopsy of the lungs of covid-19 dead cases reveals how the virus spreads and destroys tissues

the study included patients who died between March and July 2020, ranging from 3 days to 47 days after the onset of symptoms. This different time frame allows scientists to compare short-term, medium-term and long-term cases. Each case showed findings consistent with diffuse alveolar injury, which hindered the normal oxygen flow of the blood and eventually thickened and stiffened the lungs

they also found that sars-cov-2 directly infected basal epithelial cells in the lungs, hindering their basic function of repairing damaged airways and lungs and generating healthy tissues. This process is different from the way influenza viruses attack lung cells. This provides scientists with additional information when evaluating or developing antiviral therapies

researchers from the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases of the National Institutes of health led the project in cooperation with the National Institute of biomedical imaging and bioengineering and the U.S. Food and drug administration. Other collaborators include the Institute of systems biology in Seattle, the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, the St. John’s Cancer Institute in Santa Monica, California, the University of Southern California Keck medical center in Los Angeles, the University of Washington harbor view medical center in Seattle, the University of Vermont medical center in Burlington and the Memorial Sloan Kettering cancer center in New York City