2021-11-21

“Lightsail 2” solar sail satellite has been in normal operation for 30 months, laying the foundation for follow-up missions

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8a10fd253329d95 - "Lightsail 2" solar sail satellite has been in normal operation for 30 months, laying the foundation for follow-up missions

“Lightsail 2” solar sail satellite has been in normal operation for 30 months, laying the foundation for follow-up missions

“Lightsail 2” solar sail satellite has been in normal operation for 30 months, laying the foundation for follow-up missions(1)

“Lightsail 2” solar sail satellite has been in normal operation for 30 months, laying the foundation for follow-up missions(2)

one month after launch, when guangfan 2 launched its 32 square meter ultra-thin Mylar sail, the mission was declared successful because the sail improved the orbit of the bread sized spacecraft

bill Nye, CEO of the Planetary Society (TPS), said at a post deployment press conference: “We will enter a higher orbital altitude without rocket fuel, just driven by sunlight. You can fly spacecraft and get propulsion in space. There is nothing but photons. This idea is amazing. For me, you will sail in too much sunlight, which is very romantic.” Members of the solar

TPS raised $7 million for the project, which will share mission data with NASA and assist in three upcoming solar sail missions: NEA scout, solar cruiser and ACS3. NEA scout plans to take NASA’s space launch system rocket to the moon as early as February 2022 during the Artemis I test flight. The mission will use its space launch system rocket Sails leave near the moon to visit an asteroid.

solar sails use the power of photons from the sun to push the spacecraft. Although photons have no mass, they can still transfer a small amount of momentum. Therefore, when photons hit the solar sail, the spacecraft is pushed far away from the sun. Over time, if a spacecraft has no atmosphere in space Bound by layers, it is possible to accelerate to incredibly high speeds