2021-11-20

Visualization tools show a large number of debris clouds generated by Russian anti satellite missile tests

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f0af2b881ef1f2d - Visualization tools show a large number of debris clouds generated by Russian anti satellite missile tests

it will take weeks or even months to fully understand how bad the situation is, but the early visualization tool of satellite tracker for anti satellite test shows that a large number of space debris traces are left after the disintegration of the satellite. The debris looks like a dot like snake in orbit, stretching out in the same direction as the Kosmos 1408 satellite once moved around the earth. Moreover, there is one thing that the visualizers agree: the “fragment snake” will not disappear soon. Leo labs, a private US space tracking company, wrote in a blog post: “in the next few years to decades, the debris of Kosmos 1408 will have some potential collision risks to most satellites in low earth orbit.”

by EU space surveillance and tracking (SST) Two visual images produced by AgI, a network and space software company, reveal what may have happened at the first time of the impact when a Russian missile intercepted Kosmos 1408. They all show how debris clouds grow and spread throughout space. AgI’s simulation also shows how close the debris cloud intersects the international space station, verifying NASA’s concerns and the agency’s decision to let astronauts take refuge in place

Visualization tools show a large number of debris clouds generated by Russian anti satellite missile tests

another visualization tool created by Hugh Lewis, an engineering professor specializing in space debris at the University of Southampton, shows the extent to which the debris of Kosmos 1408 spreads in space. Lewis explained that when the Russian missile hit the satellite, every piece of debris generated got a little kick and sent them to higher and lower altitudes. Each piece is moving at a different speed, depending on the height of its orbit

“even if they started together, the current situation is that debris in larger orbits takes longer to orbit the earth, while debris in smaller orbits takes less time to orbit the earth,” Lewis told the verge. “Therefore, a satellite in low orbit seems to move ahead of a satellite in high orbit, which is why it is elongated.”

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Lewis said that the debris cloud will continue to deform over time. Debris in low orbit will fall to the earth and leave orbit faster, while debris in high orbit will stay in space longer

at present, Lewis’s visualization tools rely on simulations based on where we think these debris may be, taking into account the size of Kosmos 1408 and the physical principles of missile impact on satellites. However, as the real-world data from the test continues to emerge, the visualization will become more real. The US space command is responsible for tracking objects in space, but it has not provided the public with any tracks from anti satellite tests</ P>

researchers hope to track this material from the simultaneous interpreting of different sensors from the ground radar station to the optical telescope. However, even the most advanced trackers may take some time to know the location of everything

meanwhile, leolabs wrote in a blog post that it has calculated the path of nearly 300 fragments in the test, which is likely to be the largest fragment after rupture. The company pointed out that objects in low orbit should re-enter the earth’s atmosphere and burn down in the next five years. However, debris in higher orbits may remain in orbit for decades. As all these satellite debris decay in orbit, they will continue to pose a risk to the space station and other satellites. It is possible to knock down a running satellite with only one collision with fast-moving debris

“it won’t be a short-term problem,” Lewis said. “It will affect space operations at least in this decade and the next.”